All A-Board! Review: Board @ Exeter

Board is a café-bar located on Exeter’s South Street, yet it offers much more than your usual bar: specialising in a variety of board games. On 13th February 2018, I went along to see if it was worth a recommendation. Upon entering Board, I was immediately greeted by warm and friendly staff who were quick…

Preview: BSO’s ‘Elgar Cello Eulogy’ @ The Great Hall

After the resounding success of their ‘Heroes & Monsters’ concert last week, the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra are once again coming to Exeter this Wednesday to bring you the works of Wagner, Elgar, and Dvořák. ‘Everything good and nice and clean and fresh and sweet is far away – never to return’ wrote Edward Elgar after…

Review: BSO’s ‘Heroes & Monsters’ @ The Great Hall

The much-anticipated arrival of Hollywood classics to the Exeter University Great Hall finally took place on Thursday. Pete Harrison brought a touch of West End showmanship to the occasion, introducing each piece with enthusiasm and humour and conducting the orchestra with passion. A career-break year for Harrison is marked by debuts with the Royal Philharmonic,…

Review: Lover For A Day

Philippe Garrel’s latest film is a set-piece about fidelity and sexual conquest. Lover for a Day is the portrait of a relationship in Paris, apparently set in the modern-day, but dripping with the essence of the 1960s. Even the events the characters’ reference are from a time before most of the audience sat in the…

Review: Cider Tasting and Pizza Evening @ The Stable

Last Thursday, Razz was treated to an amazing Cider Tasting experience at The Stable in Exeter. The evening was a great success and here are some of the highlights from our writers: Anna Hartley: “The cider tasting evening at The Stable was so fun – as someone who knows very little about cider I was…

The Best Films on Netflix

Whatever deadline you are avoiding, you want to make sure you spend your time actually watching something you enjoy, not scrolling through a bewildering amount of Netflix categories deciding what to watch. By no means an exhaustive list, these are just some of the best feature films the online platform has on offer. From huge…

Review: Nina – A Story About Me and Nina Simone

If you sat waiting for Nina – A Story About Me and Nina Simone to begin, perhaps comfortably looking forward to an easy evening tumbling through Nina Simone’s extensive body of work, you’d be in for a real shock. Whilst Josette Bushell-Mingo does perform a number of classic Nina Simone tracks – from “Sinnerman” to…

Exhibition Review: Simon Bayliss ‘Kangaroo Beach’

Based in St Ives but raised in Devon and the Bahamas, contemporary artist Simon Bayliss’ newest exhibition fits perfectly with the Exeter Phoenix, our city’s thriving cultural arts centre. Often exploring the conflicting feelings of respect and irreverence in a place steeped with proud artistic and cultural history, Bayliss’ relationship with the Cornish landscape features…

Ruby Tandoh’s ‘Eat Up!’ Book Event

Food today is confusing. Well, perhaps not food itself, but the exhausting narratives of diet culture, wellness, good fats and bad fats certainly permeates into our brains and dictates to us, like a toxic friend, what we should be eating. In this landscape, I’ve often wondered why I’m craving a simple cheddar cheese sandwich on…

Album Review: Technology by Don Broco

As the name Technology suggests, Don Broco’s third studio album is a sharp, tongue-in-cheek take on the things that have infiltrated our daily lives over the past few years, from smart phones to Brexit to Trump’s fake news. Musically, Don Broco have always been a little difficult to pin down, flip flopping between the two…

Preview: Don Broco @ O2 Academy Bristol 9/2/18

Following the release of their 3rd album Technology this week, Don Broco are currently embarking on a 3 week UK headline tour kicking off in Bedford, the town where the band met and formed all the way back in 2008. They’ll be heading down to the South-West on the 9th February to play a massive…

5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Going Vegan

Over 150,000 of us took part in ‘Veganuary’, a whole month with no eggs, meat, fish or dairy or any animal-derived products. With celebrities such as Harry Potter star Evanna Lynch, comedian Carl Donnelly and even Miley Cyrus jumping on the plant-based bandwagon, it’s no wonder that Veganism is set to be one of the…

Review: Hanna

Hanna, a one-woman show by Off West End Award Nominee Sam Potter at the Bike Shed Theatre this week, was nothing short of a heart-warming, funny piece of exceptional theatre. Not quite sure what to expect from a show made-up of a cast of one, I was pleasantly surprised at how captivated and touched I…

Books for your 2018 Bookshelf

For everyone looking to take a break this term with some non-course related reading, 2018 is set to be a very exciting year for new books. Here are five of the most hotly-anticipated releases that will be rolling off the presses over the next six months… Leni Zumas, Red Clocks (Harper Collins, January 2018) A…

Preview: BSO’s ‘Heroes and Monsters’ @ The Great Hall

There is an enduring appeal to film music. It has a tendency to reward with emotionally gratuitous melodies, the ‘sugar’ of a piece, without the tensions and lengthy virtuosic fiddling of traditional classical music. Scores provide memorable soundbites, fragments of melodies that stay with us whether we wish them to or not. They have a…

Review: BSO’s ‘Monumental Brahms’

The Bournemouth Symphony orchestra brought another selection of outstanding work to Exeter University this last week. Their ‘Monumental Brahms’ concert, conducted by Kirill Karabits brought the titular composer together with Boris Lyatoshinsky in a remarkable and moving concert. I must admit, however, that Brahms is not a composer I am familiar with. It had been…

Review: Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘The Mikado’

Of all the theatrical societies at Exeter University, Gilbert and Sullivan is the oldest, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. To commemorate the occasion, this distinguished production company performed The Mikado, one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most well-known plays and arguably their magnum opus. The story is set in small-town Japan, ruled by the Emperor…

My First Year Experience

From getting the infamous ‘Freshers’ Flu’ to spending far too many nights in The Imperial, my first year experience appears fairly conventional on the surface, but that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been without its ups and downs. I have learned that it’s ok to not always get along with your flat as there are options…

Review: Ciaran Austin’s ‘Full Circle/Moving’

Ciaran Austin has just released his latest EP featuring ‘Full Circle’ and ‘Moving’ , demonstrating his own skillful talents and those of the members of his band, Cantaloupe Island. Recorded at Sticky Studios, the self-produced EP takes a unique approach to what may be considered grime rap by transforming with a more uplifting melody and…

Review: Really Want to Hurt Me

Most will be able to relate to how music can provide an escape from reality, shutting out the rest of the world while you live in the music. For the protagonist of Really Want to Hurt Me, music is a way to evade the bullying that is synonymous with his school life. He finds himself…

Review: BSO ‘Triumph & Passion’ @ The Great Hall

The ritual is by now familiar to me. I took my seat a few rows back from the front, settled in and took down the names of some players. The hall, smelling faintly of gravy, gradually filled with an eager audience, and the orchestra tuned their instruments with ears fixed on the most minute discrepancies…

Get the Look for Less: Kitted Out In Knitwear

It is said that the cable-knit sweatshirt was used in the 19th Century to protect fishermen from harsh weather conditions and cold sea air. Considering January and February tend to be the coldest months of the year, this trend could not be more welcome. However, it does not seem right to describe the cable-knit jumper…

Queer Screens: Sebastiane

The Exeter University Arts and Culture wing continued its Queer Screens programme this week (every Monday, 4:30, in Queens LT1). Each week, the series’ organizer Dr Joao Florencio, shows and introduces an LGBTQ+ related film, in an innovative season that from the outset is offering powerful works of cinema. The latest instalment was Sebastiane, by…

Review: Singin’ in the Rain

Footlights’ production of Singin’ in the Rain was a remarkable success, more than doing justice to the 1952 Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen-directed classic film. The student-led production included the original’s song and dance numbers, performed with enormous talent. They maintained all the film’s feel-good energy, filling the stage at the Northcott Theatre with near professional levels of…

Review: Lana Del Rey’s ‘Lust for Life’

Lana Del Rey is smiling on the cover of her fourth studio album, Lust for Life. A step away from her usual seductive pout, her smile signals the album’s slight shift from the moody, pained darkness of her previous music to this new, sunnier sound. She still remains true to her vintage themes of Hollywood…

Review: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

(contains spoilers) Three Billboards is the latest film from director Martin McDonagh. Fresh from multiple victories at the Golden Globes (Best Drama, Best Actress in a Drama, Best Supporting Actor, Best Screenplay – not too shabby), it centres around the blistering anger of Mildred Haynes, a mother who takes on the local police force after…

Review: The Post

The Post follows the story of the Washington Post editorial board in the mid 1960s: their financial struggles as the newspaper becomes a public corporation, their competition with the New York Times, and most of all, their decision on how to report on the Vietnam War. It soon becomes apparent that successive presidents had covered…

Review: Little Shop of Horrors

Little Shop of Horrors, the brainchild of Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, is a zany musical about abusive relationships, a giant carnivorous plant and the cost of success. The premise is pure B movie sci-fi: an extraterrestrial plant requires human blood to grow – the more it grows, the more flesh it desires. However, Mushnik’s…

Preview: BSO ‘Monumental Brahms’ @ The Great Hall

After handing over the baton for the season thus far, Kirill Karabits comes home to lead his orchestra for the ‘Monumental Brahms’ concert next week. Karabits has been the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra’s chief conductor since 2008, and under his care the orchestra has prospered. At present the orchestra reaches 5,000 concert-goers every week, maintains a…

Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra Vibes Scheme

Are you a classical concert newbie looking for new experiences or a performance veteran wanting cheap tickets to enjoy even more of what you love? The Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra (BSO) Vibes scheme offers young adults the chance to attend mind opening performances for only £5 a ticket! The BSO Vibes scheme aims to open the…

Preview: BSO ‘Triumph and Passion’ Concert @ The Great Hall

For their first concert after the Christmas season, the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra have once again put together an exciting programme of Russian and Soviet composers for Friday 26th January. The three pieces set to be played are the ‘Adagio’ from Khachaturian’s ballet Spartacus, Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2, and Tchaikovsky’s fifth symphony. Born in modern…

EJ Plays: Blues Run the Game

You may be aware it’s January again: congratulations on making it back and welcome to the year 2018. There are so many reasons why people don’t like January: it’s dark, it’s cold, and after the excessive festivities of December, January seems rather dull. These complaints and various others are symptomatic of the dreaded “January blues”,…

Review: A Clockwork Orange

Set in a dystopian England of gang violence, authoritarian rule and Russian-influenced slang, A Clockwork Orange follows the story of teenage delinquent Alex, who asserts himself the only way he knows how – by being nastier than everyone in the world around him. The play follows his demise: from life as an erratically aggressive gang…

2018: A Year of Music

2018 has barely begun and it’s already looking like a bumper year for music, boasting an impressive range of new albums from musical veterans and breakthrough artists alike. Here are just a few of the exciting releases coming our way in the new year. Vance Joy Nation of Two Release date February (exact date tbc)  It’s…

2018: A Year of TV

Rife with tyrannical leaders building walls, the constant drivel of Brexit polluting our newsfeeds, and the colossal embarrassment of the Oscars mix up that had our toes curling from behind our screens, 2017 has been a tumultuous year to say the least. Potentially more distressing than all of this, 2017 left the state of television…

48 Hours in Porto

Mentioning to the average Brit that you spent a semester living abroad in Portugal usually triggers questions relating to the Algarve and its reputation for beaches, booze and bronzed skin. However, in recent years the rest of the country has gained popularity thanks to the renaissance undergone by its capital, Lisbon. With more and more…

EJ Plays: You Don’t Own Me

If you’ve grown sick with disappointment, disillusionment, and anger created by the deluge of unacceptable behaviour from the political and (pseudo-)talented elite, then I might have just the remedy for you… Although intended to be used for short-term relief, full playlist intake is recommended at height of: Indignation, Inertia, Inferiority, General bewilderment, All of the…

2018: A Year of Film

There is no denying that 2017 was an absolute CORKER for film. We were treated to the musical spectacles of La La Land and Baby Driver, the emotive love stories of Call Me by Your Name and The Big Sick, the cinematic achievements of Dunkirk and Blade Runner 2049 and most excitingly the continuation of…

Looking Ahead to 2018

In preparing for January exams, and slogging through the seemingly unending list of reading for next term, the end of the year has come surprisingly quickly. It seems as though the more years go by, the quicker the end of the next one comes about, and this year is no exception. I find it difficult…

New Year’s Resolutions: From Clichés to Costa

“…Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come, Whispering ‘it will be happier’…” – Alfred, Lord Tennyson It’s all well and good saying that you’re going to go to the gym three times a week starting January or that you’re going to avoid taking trips to Costa between lectures but, as most students…

Your New Year’s Eve Guide

How to have a great end to a terrible year This year has been tough, to say the least. Our politics is in disarray, overlord Trump seems one petulant strop away from destroying us all, and we have seen the loss of thousands of innocent lives in national and international tragedies. But don’t let this…

A Christmas Tale: Reads to get you through the festive season

A short list of festive reads, most of which are candy for the brain, but after all, it’s Christmas! Let It Snow by John Green, Lauren Myracle, and Maureen Johnson I read Let It Snow last year during the Christmas holiday, and to be honest, I wasn’t expecting much. I had read John Green’s other,…

Our Favourite Christmas Songs

Love it or hate it, from the second the last firework pops on 5th November, Christmas music is inescapable. It’s on the radio, it’s on your television, it’s in every single bustling high street shop. But Christmas music doesn’t have to mean the same 10 songs you hear year after year on the same naff…

2018: A Year of Art

From St Ives to Liverpool, covering everything from Bellini to Basquiat, we’ve got plenty of top art exhibitions across the country to look forward to in 2018. So get your culture fix with this varied selection of red-hot shows over the coming year! Basquiat: Boom for Real Barbican Art Gallery, Until 28 January Finishing soon…

Our Top 5 Christmas Films

No need to look any further for the definitive list of top 5 Christmas films – you’ve found it. 5. Love Actually (2003) 2h 15m. Dir. Richard Curtis. Love Actually represents Christmas guilty pleasure at its best. Best watched while loading up on mince pies, mulled wine, and avoiding eye contact with elderly relatives during…

An Exeter Christmas in Pictures

The Christmas season has arrived! So whether you are spending it camped out in the library, with housemates and friends, or at home, wherever in the world that may be, here are is a beautiful slideshow of photographs of Christmas in our special city, by Erin Coyle, for you to enjoy.

Review: A Christmas Prince

Whoever runs the Netflix twitter account has probably made it onto their bosses naughty list this year after causing a stir with the tweet “To the 53 people who’ve watched A Christmas Prince every day for the past 18 days: who hurt you?”. This prompted a backlash of hurt viewers, who were concerned about their…

Review: Star Wars: The Last Jedi

I consider myself a Star Wars fan. I first watched A New Hope when I was five years old, and I’ve enjoyed the franchise ever since. So I went to see the midnight premier of The Last Jedi with high expectations, having enjoyed all the other films. While there were some fantastic scenes and characters…