The Paddon Award 2018

Our university is bursting with artistic students, from those who are active members of music, drama and art societies to those who take a more personal and introverted approach to their art.  On Tuesday 27th March I was lucky enough to attend this year’s Paddon Award ceremony; a small, intimate event which recognises artistic talent…

#FillTheGap Workshop and Protest with Like A Dude Theatre Company

On Thursday 22nd March, I had the pleasure of attending Like A Dude Theatre Company’s workshop and protest that questioned, and ultimately campaigned against, the gender pay gap. The experience was truly extraordinary and genuinely empowering. Here is how it went. On Thursday morning I headed out and gathered with the other participants outside of…

Review: ‘One Man, Two Guvnors’ by Exeter University Theatre Company

Thoroughly ridiculous and completely hilarious, EUTCO’s production of ‘One Man, Two Guvnors’ kept the audience on the edge of their seat. A modern adaptation by Richard Bean of the Commedia dell’arte play “Servant of Two Masters”, the show is set in a delightful 1960s Brighton, with an eclectic range of characters, songs, dance and foolery,…

Interview with George Mann, Writer and Director of ‘Translunar Paradise’

I saw Theatre Ad Infinitum’s ‘Translunar Paradise’ the night before my interview with George Mann, who wrote, directed and performed in the production, and is the Co-Artistic Director of the company. Mann’s powerful and emotionally engaging piece of work explores the theme of grief through the recently widowed William, who is struggling to accept the…

Review: Soldier On @ Northcott Theatre

Jonathan Lewis’ Soldier On had an interesting premise. The play features a group of ex-soldiers and other military associates who join together to perform their own original play as a bonding experience to help them through the trauma caused by war, and what happens when you leave the ‘military family’. With a cast made up…

Review: Spotlights A Night at the Musicals II

Spotlights’ latest all singing all dancing production was a knock-out at Exeter Phoenix this Monday and Tuesday. A talented bunch of musical lovers took to the stage to wow us with A Night at the Musicals. With hits from all decades, including classics from Les Miserables, to new fan-favourites Hamilton and Matilda, and some newer…

Review: Nina – A Story About Me and Nina Simone

If you sat waiting for Nina – A Story About Me and Nina Simone to begin, perhaps comfortably looking forward to an easy evening tumbling through Nina Simone’s extensive body of work, you’d be in for a real shock. Whilst Josette Bushell-Mingo does perform a number of classic Nina Simone tracks – from “Sinnerman” to…

Review: Hanna

Hanna, a one-woman show by Off West End Award Nominee Sam Potter at the Bike Shed Theatre this week, was nothing short of a heart-warming, funny piece of exceptional theatre. Not quite sure what to expect from a show made-up of a cast of one, I was pleasantly surprised at how captivated and touched I…

Review: Gilbert and Sullivan’s ‘The Mikado’

Of all the theatrical societies at Exeter University, Gilbert and Sullivan is the oldest, celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. To commemorate the occasion, this distinguished production company performed The Mikado, one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s most well-known plays and arguably their magnum opus. The story is set in small-town Japan, ruled by the Emperor…

Review: Really Want to Hurt Me

Most will be able to relate to how music can provide an escape from reality, shutting out the rest of the world while you live in the music. For the protagonist of Really Want to Hurt Me, music is a way to evade the bullying that is synonymous with his school life. He finds himself…

Review: Little Shop of Horrors

Little Shop of Horrors, the brainchild of Alan Menken and Howard Ashman, is a zany musical about abusive relationships, a giant carnivorous plant and the cost of success. The premise is pure B movie sci-fi: an extraterrestrial plant requires human blood to grow – the more it grows, the more flesh it desires. However, Mushnik’s…

Review: A Christmas Carol

I think the term ‘like stepping back in time’ is overused, especially when describing anything vaguely not from the modern world. However, for A Christmas Carol, read by Pip Utton as Charles Dickens, it seems wholly appropriate. It is a play not set in our time, nor specifically the Victorian era. Rather, it seems to…