Review: The Weir

“It’s Ophelia” the man behind me whispered as The Weir opened with the sound of wind whipping across the stage. This English Touring Theatre and Mercury Theatre Colchester co-production certainly chose an atmospheric night for its opening at the Exeter Northcott. Featuring a similar stormy night, Conor McPherson’s The Weir tells the story of what…

Interview: Sam O’Mahony from The Weir

When I met with actor, Sam O’Mahony, to discuss his role as Brendan in Mercury Theatre Colchester and English Touring Theatre’s co-production of The Weir, I was yet to see the performance myself at the Exeter Northcott Theatre. From some googling, I knew an outline of the plot but I was keen to hear how…

Review: Around the World in 80 Days

I like Around the World in 80 Days. It may not be grand or shatter your sense of the limits of theatre, but it is an awful lot of fun. It provides a sometimes welcome evening’s distraction. Often, that’s all you need.   As you might have already guessed, this production at the Exeter Northcott…

Review: Kate Bonna’s ‘All The Things I Lied About’

Katie Bonna’s ‘All The Things I Lied About’ at the Bike Shed Theatre was an honest, thought-provoking piece in the style of a TED talks. Bonna delivered to her audience her take on the impact of everyday lies, forcing us to face the reality of our post-truth society. On arrival, Bonna charmed the audience with…

Review: Wait Until Dark

Wait Until Dark is the last of just three crime dramas penned by Frederick Knott. Published in 1966, it was made famous by the 1967 film of the same name starring Audrey Hepburn leading to several on-stage revivals, on tour with The Original Theatre Company most recently. The action follows a trio of criminals –…

Single Review: ‘You’ll be Fine’ by Pom Poko

Pom Poko’s name is taken from a 1994 Japanese animated film about shape-shifting raccoons, and their music is about as off-the-wall as this fact would suggest. The intriguing Norwegian quartet, who hail from Trondheim, are one of several new groups to emerge from Scandinavia this year. They are already making a name for themselves with…

Review: Education, Education, Education

It’s Friday, 2nd May 1997. The teachers of a British comprehensive school are jubilant with optimism, fuelled by the prospect of a newly-elected Labour government injecting the education system with some much-needed cash. A beaming headmaster, Hugh Mills (Tom England), shows newbie assistant teacher from Germany, Tobias (James Newton) around his school, the immense ability…

City Breaks: Edinburgh

In one of the most beautiful countries in the world, Edinburgh stands tall as a hub of creativity surrounded by Georgian and Gothic architecture. Never losing its charm, Edinburgh and its cobbled streets will always be a city I am happy to return to time and time again. It’s magical and no wonder JK Rowling…

Review: Kill the Cat Theatre – The Beginner’s Guide to Navigation

The Beginner’s Guide to Navigation is about maps. It’s also about cheese jamborees. And anarchy, and relationships, and Eurocentrism. The Beginner’s Guide to Navigation is about a lot of things but most of all it’s about the poignant message hidden amongst a stream of hilarious far-fetched nonsense. Having been led grossly astray by an outdated…

Pub Talks: A Pint Sized Conversation Review

  As I walk into the Boat Shed Theatre I am greeted by one of Pub Talks’ actors. She asks me to write down three things that made me happy today. I then find my seat and am approached by another cast member who hands me a packet of crisps; I get lucky with prawn…

Preview: Pub Talks at The Boat Shed

Kill the Cat theatre company, The Bike Shed’s graduate company for 2016/17, will be performing their newest piece, Pub Talks, at The Boat Shed festival on 10 and 11 July. The company, which was formed following Madeleine Allardice, Dylan Frankland and Megan Luke’s graduation last year, will be joined by performers Rosa Day-Jones and Tobias…