Artist Profile: Claes Oldenburg

Razz magazine’s artist profile on the sculptor, Claes Oldenburg, and the way that his work reflects issues in the modern day world.

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The Paddon Award 2018

Our university is bursting with artistic students, from those who are active members of music, drama and art societies to those who take a more personal and introverted approach to their art.  On Tuesday 27th March I was lucky enough to attend this year’s Paddon Award ceremony; a small, intimate event which recognises artistic talent…

Review: Lady Bird

When I was about 16 I stumbled across Frances Ha, Greta Gerwig’s writing debut, on Netflix. I fell in love with it and watched it constantly, I even changed my cover picture on Facebook to a black and white still from the film (oh to be an obnoxiously edgy 16 year old again). In the…

Preview: A Fantastic Woman

Winner of this year’s Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, A Fantastic Woman will be shown at The Exeter Phoenix this weekend. The film follows the experiences of a transgender woman called Marina in the aftermath of her boyfriend’s death. The film was written and produced by Gonzalo Maza, a current student at Exeter…

Review: You Were Never Really Here

Lynne Ramsay’s latest feature is nasty, brutish, and short. Is that a good thing? In a world of cinema so desensitised by gratuitous violence, sexual deviancy and general nastiness, it’s hard to tell anymore. Joaquin Phoenix plays, with his usual withdrawn performative mastery, a PTSD-suffering hitman hired to recover the daughter of a politician (Ekaterina…

Sir John Everett Millais’ ‘Ophelia’ – A Profile

Sir John Everett Millais painted ‘Ophelia’ when he was only 22. It is one of Tate Britain’s most loved paintings (boasting the impressive feat of being its most popular postcard) and possibly the most famous Shakespeare painting of all time. Painted between 1851-2, it’s an early Pre-Raphaelite work and shows the aftermath of Ophelia’s suicide…

The Best Documentaries on Netflix

If you feel like swapping yet another re-watch of Friends for something a little more intellectually stimulating, there are some great and thought-provoking documentaries on Netflix that are definitely worth checking out. Plus, documentaries are educational, so you don’t even have to feel bad about procrastinating from your degree… Seeing Allred Gloria Allred is something…

Review: Phantom Thread

I want to preface this review by saying that I honestly do not know how to review Phantom Thread after one sitting. This doesn’t mean that I disliked the film; in fact, I thought it was great. However, I feel after one viewing I have only digested and understood one third of what this film…

Queer Screens: Sebastiane

The Exeter University Arts and Culture wing continued its Queer Screens programme this week (every Monday, 4:30, in Queens LT1). Each week, the series’ organizer Dr Joao Florencio, shows and introduces an LGBTQ+ related film, in an innovative season that from the outset is offering powerful works of cinema. The latest instalment was Sebastiane, by…

Review: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

(contains spoilers) Three Billboards is the latest film from director Martin McDonagh. Fresh from multiple victories at the Golden Globes (Best Drama, Best Actress in a Drama, Best Supporting Actor, Best Screenplay – not too shabby), it centres around the blistering anger of Mildred Haynes, a mother who takes on the local police force after…

Review: Star Wars: The Last Jedi

I consider myself a Star Wars fan. I first watched A New Hope when I was five years old, and I’ve enjoyed the franchise ever since. So I went to see the midnight premier of The Last Jedi with high expectations, having enjoyed all the other films. While there were some fantastic scenes and characters…

Exhibition Review: Visible Girls Revisited @ Exeter Phoenix

Everyone has those dreadfully embarrassing teenage pictures that you and your friends snapped in your bedroom at 14-years-old. Now you keep them under lock and key in a box in the bottom of your wardrobe because, for some reason, you just can’t get rid of them. Every time they resurface they bombard you with memories…